The Song Of The Nymph, by Anna Erdahl

In The Song Of The Nymph, a wood nymph falls for a young man, only to find out that she is the reason for his downfall. Here’s a little excerpt:

She considered turning into a deer to cross his path, or maybe a bird to land on his shoulder. No matter what creature of the forest she considered, she would still not be able to communicate. And, as she had seen in other interactions between man and animal, she could not be guaranteed that the meeting would go very well.

Then she had an idea: could she turn into a human? She had never tried; it had never occurred to her. But, humans have been in her forest as long as the human-bred animals, like pheasants and dogs, and she had been able to take their form before, so they needn’t be native for her to borrow their shape.

Risking losing track of John, the nymph retreated a good distance in order to experiment.

She settled down and hovered just above the ground. Like she has done when transmuting into other animals, the nymph concentrated on the form she wished to take, starting at her core and working outwards, creating arms, hands, and then fingers; legs, feet, and toes; a neck, a head, a nose, and then she opened her eyes.

At first glance it appeared to be successful; the nymph took a deep breath and wiggled her arms around, then stood on each foot, then shook her head. Her hair was a deep copper and extended down to the middle of her back in thick curls. Her limbs felt long and thin, like a doe’s legs, but the nymph could feel the strength in her hands and legs. The body was that of a runner and a fighter; she bent both legs and jumped, and it felt good. The nymph opened her mouth and said something she’d heard from lone humans in the forest many times before: “Hello?” It seemed to come out fine; the nymph was very pleased with herself.

But something was not quite right. It took her a few seconds before it dawned on her that she had never seen a human without any clothing. She had an idea that there were nipples, but she studied the strangely specific location of the public hair before she realized that, if she showed up in front of John without any clothes, the nymph had no idea how he’d react.

The Song Of The Nymph, by Anna Erdahl is available at Smashwords & Amazon.

The Song Of The Nymph paranormal erotic romance

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